News and Events

Dual ingestion at Trieste
Confirming the fact that an ingestion of birds in more engines of the same aircraft has become a phenomenon far from rare, it comes the news of an event occurred on September 26 to an Alitalia A320 taking off from Trieste. This phenomenon is taken into account by the regulators (FAA and EASA) that are studying changes of the regulation for engine certification. In Italy the most serious dual ingestion occurred at Rome Ciampino in 2008, when a Ryanair B737 was practically destroyed on landing without causing casualties. Another event occurred in 2007 at Rome Fiumicino when a Delta B767 landed back in emergency with both engines at reduced power. About thirty events of dual ingestions have been recorded in the last ten years worldwide.

 
Released the final report on a bird strike occurred on 2011

The NTSB of the United States released on 5.9.2018 the final report on the event occurred on 10.11.2011 to a Delta Airlines A320 in Minneapolis; the report followed the first information released on 11.8.2018. Incidentally, the event, quite serious, was so far unknown. This reinforces the widespread belief that the known impacts are only a small part of the total.

https://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.aviation/brief.aspx?ev_id=20120224X25922&key=1

 
Study on the tactical management of a flock of birds by a drone

The Italian press (La Repubblica) recently quoted an article published by four researchers of the California Institute of Technology, entitled "Robotic Herding of a Flock of Birds Using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle". Readers can download it here


 
Relevant occurrences of the quarter July-September 2018
  • 1 July – Sari (Iran)
    Caspian MD83, at take-off the left engine ingested a number of birds; landing back 55’ after take-off;
     
  • 3 July – Chennai (India)
    Jet Airways B737, on final a bird impacted the left engine;
     
  • 4 July – Sialkot (Pakistan)
    Emirates B777, on final an engine ingested a bird; the aircraft was unable to perform the return flight;
     
  • 5 July – London (Southend)
    Easyjet A319, during the initial climb an engine ingested a bird; the crew decided to land back at Stansted 18’ later;
     
  • 6 July – Istanbul
    MEA A320, bird strike during the initial climb; the crew decide to land back 20’ after take- off; the flight was rescheduled for the following day;
     
  • 6 July – Bergamo
    Ryanair B737, the left engine ingested a bird at the rotation; immediate return 20’ after take-off;
     
  • 10 July – Nashville (TN)
    Mesa Airlines CRJ700, on approach struck a large bird; the aircraft was unable to depart for the return flight;
     
  • 13 July – Singapore
    ANA B787, during the landing roll the right engine ingested a number of birds; return flight cancelled;
     
  • 19 July – Dublin
    Norwegian International B737, a bird strike at take-off prompts the crew to stop the climb, burn off fuel and return to Dublin; the aircraft landed back about 4:40 hours after departure;
     
  • 19 July – Washington (DC) (or Vienna)
    Austrian B767, after landing in Washington a post flight inspection revealed a bird had impacted the right hand engine's inlet causing a dent; the aircraft was unable to perform the next flights that have been cancelled;
     
  • 19 July – Paris (CDG)
    Air Transat A330, during the initial climb the right engine ingested a bird prompting the crew to perform an overweight landing; one fan blade damaged; 


    (The damaged fan blade; photo taken from Avherald.com) 
  • 23 July – Chennai
    Air India B787, on final approach descending through about 400 feet a bird impacted the nose of the aircraft that was damaged disabling the aircraft to perform its next scheduled flight; 
     
  • 25 July – Punta Gorda (FL)
    Allegiant A320, during the initial climb the crew reported a suspected tyre blowout and diverted to Orlando; later on bird remains were found in one of the engines;  
     
  • 29 July – Nantong (Cina)
    Kunming Airlines B737, after landing a post flight inspection revealed a hole at the leading edge of the vertical stabilizer caused by a number of bird strikes while turning final; the aircraft was unable to depart for the return flight; 


    (Photo taken from Avherald.com) 
  • 31 July – Lviv (Ukraine)
    UIA B737, during the initial climb a bird impacted the left engine; in the absence of abnormal indications the crew continued the climb but later decided to divert to Kiev where landed about 3:15 hours after departure; no serious damage reported;
     
  • 4 August – Bruxelles
    Brussells Airline A320, during the initial climb an engine ingested a bird; immediate return 40’ after take-off;
     
  • 6 August – Portland (OR)
    Endeavor CRJ 900, after landing the crew reported a bird strike; damage to the left wing;
     
  • 6 August – Hyderabad
  • Saudia Arabian Airlines A330, on landing struck a bird; the aircraft was unable to perform the return flight;  
  • 6 August – Munich
    Lufthansa Cityliner CRJ 900, bird strike during the approach; the aircraft was unable to perform its next flight;
     
  • 7 August – Iguazu (Argentina)
    Andes B737, during the final approach a bird impacted and penetrated the bottom part of the radome; the aircraft was unable to depart for the return flight OY-571;

  • The hole in the radome; photo taken from Avherald.com) 
  • 8 August – Churchill (Canada)
    Nolinor B737, was accelerating for takeoff when the crew observed numerous Canada geese fly over the runway and rejected takeoff at about 120 kts. The aircraft collided with a goose however; the crew set the park brake to assess the situation before returning to the apron. Upon releasing the brakes, the crew noticed the brakes had seized. Emergency services were called out to inspect the landing gear and found both tyres on the left main gear had deflated due to the melting of the fusible plugs disabling the aircraft on the runway that remained closed for 10 hours.
     
  • 12 August – Alghero
    Blue Air B737, during the take-off run struck a bird with suspected ingestion into an engine; the crew decided to land back about 15’ after take-off;
     
  • 14 August – Buenos Aires (Aeroparque)
    AerolineasArgentinas B737, during the initial climb an engine ingested a bird prompting the crew to burn off fuel and land back about one hour after take-off; the whole rotation was cancelled;
     
  • 17 August – Barcelona
    Iberia A319, rejected take-off due to the ingestion of a number of ducks in the left engine; flight cancelled;
     
  • 18 August – St. Louis (MO)
    Delta B737, after take-offthe crew issued a pilot report stating there was a large flock of birds on the runway, but they were looking good. A few seconds later, the crew advised they would need to come back, as they had just hit a lot of birds. The aircraft landed back about 10 minutes after departure.
     
  • 19 August – Cedar Rapids (IA)
    Allegiant Airlines A2320, bird strike on landing found out after an inspection; the aircraft was unable to perform its next flight;
     
  • 22 August – Orlando (Sanford) (FL)
    Allegiant Airlines A320, during the initial climb the crew reported they took a bird on departure and needed to return, then advised they were too heavy for an immediate landing and did have high vibrations though; the aircraft landed about 30 minutes after departure;
     
  • 23 August – San Francisco (CA)
    United B787, in the initial climb the crew advised they had about 4-5 bird strikes on departure; after a first decision to continue the flight, they advised they wanted to return to San Francisco as were concerned about the integrity of the airframe; the aircraftlanded  back about 80 minutes after departure;
     
  • 25 August – between Vienna and Hamburg
    Austrian A320, after landing the aircraft was unable to depart forthe return flight due to a bird strike; flight cancelled;
     
  • 27 August – Anapa (Russia)
    Red Wings A321, a post flight inspection revealed the aircraft had received a bird strike to the radome requiring its replacement; the aircraft was unable to continue its schedule;
     
  • 29 August – Saint Vincent
    Caribbean Airlines B737, bird strike during the initial climb that prompted the crew to divert to another airport;
     
  • 29 August – Davao (Philippines)
    PAL Express A321, rejected take-off at high speed due to bird ingestion in the right engine; flight cancelled;
     
  • 29 August – Cancun (Mexico)
    Viva AeroBus A320, collision supposedly with a bird during the initial climb that prompted the crew to land back;

    (The reshaped nose cone seen after landing; photo taken from Avherald.com) 
  • 3 September – Newark (NJ)
    American Airlines B737, bird strike with ingestion into the left engine during the approach; the aircraft was unable to fly the next leg;
     
  • 4 September – Faisalabad (Pakistan)
    PIA A320, bird strike on final that damaged the radome;
     
  • 10 September – Palma de Mallorca
    Eurowings Europe A320, during the take-off run an engine ingested a hare; immediate return 35’ after take-off;
     
  • 10 September – Denver (CO)
    Frontier Airlines A320, hit a bird immediately after take-off; initially the crew decided to continue the flight but later landed back after having burnt off some fuel;
     
  • 11 September – Lamezia Terme
    Easyjet A319, during the initial climb flew through a flock of birds, the left hand engine ingested a number of birds prompting the crew to shut the engine down and land back about 15 minutes after departure;
     
  • 14 September – Ostend
    TUI Airlines Belgium B737, bird strike at take-off that prompted the crew to divert to Brussels about 30’ later;
     
  • 16 September – Algiers
    Air Algerie A330, during the take-off run an engine ingested a bird; the crew rejected take-off at high speed, close to V1;
     
  • 17 September – Kathmandu (Nepal)
    Saurya Airlines CRJ 200, during the initial climbthe left engine ingested a bird; the crew did not immediately realize the nature of the event and, in the absence of abnormal indications, decided to continue the flight to destination; however, about half way into the flight the left engine began to develop vibrations.  A dead bird was found on the runway after the departure. 
    A post flight inspection revealed two fan blades of the left engine were damaged requiring repair.  As the airline owns only two aircraft and the other one was currently in maintenance, they needed to cancel all the flight of the day; 
  • 18 September – Madrid, Iberia Express A321
    during the initial climb struck a bird; in the absence of abnormal parameters the crew decided to continue the flight but was forced to land back when they realized that the aircraft received damage to the left flap track fairing;

    (Photo taken from Avherald.com) 
  • 20 September – Malta
    Air Malta A319, rejected take off at high speed (100 kts.) further to an impact with a flock of birds on the runway;
     
  • 21 September – Philadelphia (PA)
    Delta MD90, bird strike at rotation; the crew decided to continue till destination; after landing unknown damage found;
     
  • 22 September – Jackson (MS)
    Delta B717, during the landing at about 100 ft. received a bird strike on the radome;
     
  • 24 September – Riga
    Air Baltic BCS300, bird strike during the approach;
     
  • 25 September – Riga
    Air Baltic BCS300, hit some birds during the initial climb; immediately after the crew decided to land back; further to an inspection the aircraft was declared unfit to fly; 

    (Photo: GintsFeders, taken from Avherald.com) 
  • 26 September – Trieste (RonchideiLegionari)
    Alitalia A320, during the initial climb out the aircraft flew through a flock of birds and experienced a jolt prompting the crew to land back about 11 minutes after departure declaring that birds that had hit both engines; 


The role of air traffic control in the prevention of wildlife strikes at airports

Air traffic control plays a fundamental role in accident prevention within a generally clear and detailed regulatory framework. However, some air navigation service providers have been involved in legal proceedings following birdstrike events; at least in one case the Control Tower has been sentenced by a Court to refund part of the damage following an assignment of liability.

With this paper  Valter Battistoni aims to provide an analysis of the ICAO regulation on this matter, not just to ascertain possible liabilities of air traffic control in birdstrike events, but rather to assess whether and how the aforementioned regulation takes into account the role of ATC in preventive actions for safety purposes. It will also seek to understand whether the ICAO regulation is applied in a uniform way in the technical manuals of different countries, or if dissimilar interpretations exist. This is also in consideration of the introduction in several airports of new remote sensing instruments, avian radars, which will also pose additional problems of management and responsibility.

 
UPCOMING EVENTS:
 
Warsaw, 19-23 November 2018 – Conference of the World Birdstrike Association.
 
Loading
General archive