News and Events

Relevant occurrences of the quarter January-March 2018

Interesting case of a take-off clearance cancellation by the TWR operator that had observed an animal on the runway (January 7).

This is interesting because not every country attributes this responsibility to the controller, with the related obvious obligation to look out in order to identify the presence (also) of wildlife. Actually the Indian ATM manual states: ““In the event the aerodrome controller observes ... any obstruction .... such as animals or flock of birds…”

The word "observes"does not appear in the ATM manuals of other countries, nor even in the ICAO DOC 4444, which uses instead the more ambiguous term "becomes aware". India's regulation thus appears to be a commendable exercise of clarity for safety. 

  • 15 December 2017 – Toronto
    Air Canada ERJ 190, during the take off a Snowy owl (Bubo scandiacus) struck the nose gear causing damage to theleft side landing gear aft door that did not allow to retract the gear; the crew declared emergency and landed back; 
  • 6 January – Nantes
    Travel Service Poland/Smartwings B737, during the initial climb flew through a flock of birds; the right engine ingested a number of birds prompting the crew to land back about 10 minutes after departure; a post flight inspection revealed 3 fan blades of the right engine were damaged;

    https://www.ouest-france.fr/pays-de-la-loire/nantes-44000/nantes-un-boeing-737-percute-des-oiseaux-au-decollage-et-fait-demi-tour-5488693 
  • 7 January – Udaipur (India)
    Jet Airways B737, rejected take off following the cancellation of their takeoff clearance by the TWR because a Jackal (Canisaurusindicus)had been spotted on the runway; 


    (Indian Jackal; Photo taken from Wikipedia) 

  • 17 January - Salt Lake City (UT)
    Alaska Airlines B737, suffered a bird strike during the take-off run; the crew decided to continue the flight to destination (Seattle); the aircraft sustained unknown damage due to the bird strike and was grounded for maintenance;
     
  • 17 January – Nampula (Mozambico)
    LAM LinhasAereas de Mocambique B737, rejected take off at high speed further a bird ingestion into the left engine
     
  • 19 January – Guwahati (India)
    Air India A321, during the approach a bird struck the airframe probably causing a hole; the aircraft has been grounded for controls;
    https://www.ndtv.com/india-news/air-india-flight-with-160-aboard-suffers-bird-hit-while-landing-in-guwahati-1802449 
  • 23 January – Algiers
    Air Algerie A330, during the initial climb suffered a bird impact that caused abnormal indication from an engine; immediate return;

    http://www.lexpressiondz.com/actualite/284672-un-avion-d-air-algerie-percute-des-oiseaux.html 
  • 23 January – Edimburgh
    Stobart Air ATR72, a bird strike after take off prompted the crew to land back; minor damage;

    https://stv.tv/news/east-central/1406830-edinburgh-bound-flight-turns-back-after-hitting-bird 
  • 24 January – Amsterdam
    LATAM B777,was on final approach when a flock of birds flew into the way of the aircraft, one bird impacted the underside of the fuselage, another bird was ingested by the left hand engine;

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GigjNyv3OJ8 
  • 25 January – Lisbon
    TAP A319, in the initial climb a bird impacted the windscreen while reduced power on the right engine was reported; immediate return about 15 minutes after departure; 
    flight cancelled; 
  • 29 January – Zagreb
    Croatia Airlines A319, during the climb suffered a bird strike and returned for landing back about 40’ after departure; radome damaged;
     
  • 30 January – Islamabad
    Airblue A321, after take-off ingested a bird into one of its engines; the crew continued the climb but then decided to return due to some abnormal engine indications about 35 minutes after departure; 
     
  • 4 February – Sacramento (CA)
    Southwest B737, during the initial climb a bird impacted the aircraft prompting the crew to land back 10’ later; minor damage;

    http://sacramento.cbslocal.com/2018/02/04/bird-strike-causes-emergency-landing-at-sacramento-international-airport 
  • 7 February – Ahmedabad
    GoAir A320, during the initial climb a bird impacted the aircraft prompting the crew to land back 11’ later;

    https://www.latestly.com/india/information/goair-720-ahmedabad-delhi-flight-suffers-bird-hit-today-flight-cancelled-all-passengers-safe-22090.html 
  • 8 February – Johannesburg
    Comair B737, during the initial climb suffered a strike with a medium sized bird, probably a Grey Hooded Gull (Chroicocephaluscirrocephalus); immediate return 20’ later; 

    (The nose of the aircraft; photo taken from Avherald.com) 

  • 10 February – Portland (OR)
    United A319, bird strike during the approach;
  • 16 February – between Dakar (Senegal) and Banjul (Gambia)
    Brussels Airlines A330, after landing in Banjul a post flight inspection revealed the aircraft had received a bird strike during the flight and was unable to continue schedule; the flight was postponed by 49 hours and operated by another aircraft;
     
  • 18 February – Bhubaneswar (India)
    Indigo A320, at take-off hit an owl and made a precautionary landing; no damage reported; 

    http://odishatv.in/odisha/body-slider/bhubaneswar-new-delhi-indigo-flight-makes-emergency-landing-after-bird-strike-277286
  • 20 February – Zurich
    Swiss Global Airlines Bombardier CS300, during the initial climb the crew reported they had hit a large bird during the departure roll, but they wanted to continue for now; later suspecting some engine damage landed back about 30 minutes after departure; flight cancelled;
     
  • 22 February – Nagpur (India)
    Air India A320, during the final approach a bird impacted the right hand wing causing damage to the right hand flaps; the aircraft was unable to continue its schedule;
     
  • 22 February – Kish (Iran)
    Kish Air Fokker 100, a bird strike at take-off is believed to have caused a later windshield crack and a diversion to the closest airport;
     
  • 23 February - Tuxtla Gutierrez (Messico)
    Interjet A320, during the initial climb a bird struck the left engine prompting the crew to land back;
     
  • 27 February – Siargao (Philippines)
    Skyjet Airlines Bae146, after landing suffered a runway excursion; the aircraft stopped in the grass, just past the runway end; the cause of the incident is said to be a bird strike; dead birds were reportedly found on the runway;

    https://news.mb.com.ph/2018/02/27/jet-overshoots-runway-in-siargao-all-passengers-safe
    https://aviation-safety.net/wikibase/wiki.php?id=206822 
  • 28 February – Izmir
    Turkish Airlines B737, bird strike during the initial climb and crew decision to land back; flight cancelled;
  • 3 March – Nashville (TN)
    Republic Airlines ERJ170, after take-off the crew reported they had a potential bird strike and requested a runway inspection while climbing out; despite the runway inspection had found debris, the crew decided to continue the flight to destination where damage was found caused by the bird strike;
     
  • 5 March – Tehran
    Lufthansa B747, on final approach the inboard left hand engine ingested a bird;  
    the aircraft was unable to depart for the return flight;  
  • 10 March – Albuquerque (NM)
    Delta B757, during the initial climb an engine ingested a bird and landed back;
     
  • 11 March – Atlanta (GA)
    Delta MD90, during the initial climb the crew declared emergency further to a bird ingestion into the left engine that caused its failure; immediate return 30’ after departure;
     
  • 11 Marzo – Kumasi (Ghana)
  • Africa World Airlines ERJ 145, on landing hit a bird; no damage reported;
    http://citifmonline.com/2018/03/12/awa-renews-commitment-safe-flights-kumasi-incident 
  • 15 March – Tampa (FL)
    United A320, in the initial climb the crew reported they had taken a number of bird strikes during the take-off roll but wanted to continue their departure. About a minute later the crew reported they had a problem with the pitot #2 and wanted to return then decided to burn off fuel for about 3 hours and landed back. A runway inspection found and recovered multiple birds on the runway.
     
  • 15 March – Joao Pessoa (Brazil)
    GOL B737, during the initial climb struck a bird and returned for landing;
     
  • 17 March – Baltimore (MD)
    Southwest B737, on final at about 7 NM from the runway flew through a flock of birds receiving damage;
     
  • 22 March – Hong Kong
    Air China B737, after landing the ground staff noticed the radome had received a hole of about 1 meter in diameter;blood stains suggested the aircraft may have suffered a bird strike. The crew had not reported any anomaly;

    (The damaged radome; photo taken from Avherald.com) 

  • 25 March – Lahore
    Serene Air B737, bird strike on final; the aircraft was unable to depart for the return flight; 
     
  • 25 March – Los Angeles (CA)
    Air China B777, suffered minor damage on landing due to a bird strike; the aircraft was unable to fly its next leg;
     
  • 27 March – Murcia
    Easyjet A319, was lining up the runway for departure when the right engine ingested a number of birds resulting in an engine fire indication; the crew shut the engine down and discharged a fire bottle;
     
  • 29 March – Riberalta (Bolivia)
    Amaszonas Linea Aerea SA227 Metro, during the takeoff roll a flock of birds impacted the right engine causing the crew to reject takeoff; the aircraft veered off the runway and came to a stop down a slope; no injuries are being reported;

    https://www.eldeber.com.bo/bolivia/Avion-de-Amaszonas-se-accidenta-en-Riberalta-20180329-8268.html

    (The aircraft down the slope. Photo Fernando Galvan  taken from eldeber.bo) 

  • 29 March – East Midlands
    Ryanair B737, during the initial climb a bird impacted the aircraft causing damage to the windshield; the crew decided to land back about 10 minutes after departure;
     
  • 31 March – New York (JFK)
    Delta A319, during the initial climb the left engine ingested a bird and began to vibrate; the crew shut the engine down and landed back 13’ after take-off;

    http://abc7ny.com/delta-flight-lands-safely-at-jfk-airport-after-bird-strike/3286826

    (The left engine after landing; photo Port Authority Police taken from Avherald.com)

 
The NTSB released the factual report of the Southwest B737 accident of 23.12.2013

The American NTSB released the factual report regarding the accident suffered by a Southwest B737 on 23.12.2013. The right engine ingested a number of Mallard Ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) and suffered an uncontained engine failure; there was evidence that a piece of high-speed debris had exited the engine through the outboard fan cowl near the fan plane.

https://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.aviation/brief2.aspx?ev_id=20131224X22946&ntsbno=ENG14IA005&akey=1

 

 
The role of air traffic control in the prevention of wildlife strikes at airports

Air traffic control plays a fundamental role in accident prevention within a generally clear and detailed regulatory framework. However, some air navigation service providers have been involved in legal proceedings following birdstrike events; at least in one case the Control Tower has been sentenced by a Court to refund part of the damage following an assignment of liability.

With this paper  Valter Battistoni aims to provide an analysis of the ICAO regulation on this matter, not just to ascertain possible liabilities of air traffic control in birdstrike events, but rather to assess whether and how the aforementioned regulation takes into account the role of ATC in preventive actions for safety purposes. It will also seek to understand whether the ICAO regulation is applied in a uniform way in the technical manuals of different countries, or if dissimilar interpretations exist. This is also in consideration of the introduction in several airports of new remote sensing instruments, avian radars, which will also pose additional problems of management and responsibility.

 
UPCOMING EVENTS:
 
Baltimore, 21-23 August 2018 - Meeting of the Bird Strike Committee USA.
For further details: https://aaae.org/birdstrike?_zs=pubNc1&_zl=lskg4
 
Warsaw, 19-23 November 2018 – Conference of the World Birdstrike Association.
For further details: http://www.worldbirdstrike.com/images/WBA%202018%20Conference%20-%20call%20for%20papers.pdf
 
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